Hill of Glansie

Of the Angus Glens, it is fair to say that Glen Lethnot is the least frequented. The single-track road in does not actively encourage visitors. As it winds deeper into the valley it becomes narrower, more potted and increasingly less inviting. But despite the potholes and clunky cattle grids that jolt suspension springs into life, the journey is worth making for it reveals an isolated, some may say desolate, landscape of rolling hills, grassy slopes and heather moor. Apart from the occasional cottage and a grand pink hunting lodge, signs of life are few and far between and herein lies its charms. Read more…

Ethical Steps

At first glance, outdoor pursuits like hillwalking and camping appear to be fairly ethical activities. Respect the environment, leave no trace of your passing and you should be able to sleep easy at the end of a day in the countryside. But delve a little deeper into the whole issue of the human race’s impact on Planet Earth and you soon discover that a love of the great outdoors, whether it be hiking up mountains or enjoying a quiet Sunday afternoon stroll along the coast, could be responsible for a plethora of unfriendly activities, such as the exploitation or workers, climate change and animal cruelty. Read more…

Surviving Strathchailleach

James McRory Smith was a remarkable character. For over 30 years he lived in a remote bothy in the far north of Scotland. He cut himself off from society and clung to the wild periphery. But was he a truly reclusive individual seeking sanctuary in the great outdoors or simply an opportunistic bothy thief? Read more…