Beaten by the Moor

My bid to cross Rannoch Moor on foot did not quite go according to plan. Setting off from Bridge of Orchy, I intended to follow the West Highland Way via Inveroran to King’s House.

After a night there, I planned to take the track to Black Corries Lodge and then continue to Rannoch Station via Loch Laidon. The final leg of my journey was to follow the Road to the Isles to Corrour Station from where I would catch the train back to Bridge of Orchy.

Despite heavy rain and lashing winds, and an overwhelming urge to call the whole thing quits at Inveroran, I made it, albeit saturated, to King’s House where I spent a very pleasant night. Read more…

Scotland Outdoors – Rannoch Moor

Check out the Spring 2011 issue of the excellent Scotland Outdoors magazine (published March 7) for an article I wrote on Rannoch Moor. The piece is a portrait of this, a true area of wilderness.

Having written and filed the feature, I was inspired to explore the moor some more and I set off tomorrow to hike from Bridge of Orchy to Corrour. While crossing the moor itself is, due to the terrain, a virtually impossible task, I plan to follow the West Highland Way from Bridge of Orchy to Kings House, where I will spend my first night.

I will then follow the track east to Rannoch Station, skirting the edge of the moor, and pick up the old Road to the Isles for the final leg to Corrour via Loch Ossian. Fingers crossed for good weather and three days of excellent walking!

 

Scotland Quarterly Magazine

Scotland Quarterly is a new Scottish general interest e-magazine, covering Scotland past, present and future, focussing on the people, places, history, wildlife, nature, conservation and countryside of a nation. Published quarterly, features in the first issue, include:

Edward de Gernier – The man who brought chips to Scotland

McAlpine and the Moor – The story of how an intrepid party of railway surveyors, including one of Scotland’s most celebrated entrepreneurs, survived a winter’s night trapped on Rannoch Moor

Quake Centre – The story of Earthquake House, near Comrie

Reindeer Man – A conservation success story in the Cairngorms

Cowal’s Ghost Town – The soulless settlement of Pollphail, built to house oil workers in the 1970s but never occupied, faces an uncertain future

Lost Island Railways – Tracking down Skye’s railway history

Plus we feature a walk from Kinlochleven to the Blackwater Dam, tips on staying in mountain bothies, a short profile of Corgarff Castle and reviews of new Scottish ebooks.

Available exclusively from the Amazon Kindle Store, priced £1.06. Click here to find out more…

Re-discovering Reekie Linn

The Victorians first put Reekie Linn on the tourist map and it has remained a firm favourite with visitors to Angus ever since. One of Scotland’s most spectacular waterfalls, it cascades through a deep tree-lined canyon, throwing up a smoky mist of spray. A well-walked path follows the north bank of the River Isla to an exposed cliff-top viewpoint. However, for those with a sense of adventure and a head for heights, there is another, virtually unknown trail on the south side of the water. Read more…