Walk This Way

Check out the Walk This Way promotion running all this week in The Courier. The newspaper is giving away a set of short walking guides, the routes taken from Pocket Mountain’s series of walk books, including my title Angus & Dundee – 40 Coast and Country Walks.

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Glorious Good Friday on Rannoch Moor

I could not resist the lure of Rannoch Moor once again and, setting off to walk the Road to the Isles from Corrour Station to Rannoch Station, I was rewarded with an excellent day, dry with hazy sunshine and a cooling breeze. After driving to Rannoch Station, I boarded the 11.08am train for the short journey north to Corrour. The carriages were packed with walkers, the majority of whom spilled out on to the platform when we arrived at Corrour. Read more…

Tentsmuir Sea Eagle Walk

The return of the sea eagle – or white-tailed eagle – to Scotland is one of the great conservation success stories. The last native bird was shot on Shetland in 1918 but in the 1970s the raptor was reintroduced and experts estimate there are now 200, most roosting in the isolated western isles. Thanks to ongoing work, Britain’s largest bird of prey is now soaring over east coast waters too. Read more…

Peat Path to Fitness

Nestling in the hills above Loch Ness, Abriachan is a scattered rural community. In 1998, villagers bought 500 hectares of land from Forest Enterprise and embarked upon an ambitious project to enhance the local environment, create new jobs and attract more visitors to the area through the creation of a path network, mountain bike routes and other facilities. One of the more unusual trails to emerge from this was the Peat Path to Fitness. Read more…

Hill of Glansie

Of the Angus Glens, it is fair to say that Glen Lethnot is the least frequented. The single-track road in does not actively encourage visitors. As it winds deeper into the valley it becomes narrower, more potted and increasingly less inviting. But despite the potholes and clunky cattle grids that jolt suspension springs into life, the journey is worth making for it reveals an isolated, some may say desolate, landscape of rolling hills, grassy slopes and heather moor. Apart from the occasional cottage and a grand pink hunting lodge, signs of life are few and far between and herein lies its charms. Read more…