Glorious Good Friday on Rannoch Moor

Leaving Corrour Station

I could not resist the lure of Rannoch Moor once again and I was rewarded with an excellent day, dry with hazy sunshine and a cooling breeze.

After driving to Rannoch Station, I boarded the 11.08am train for the short journey north to Corrour. The carriages were packed with walkers, the majority of whom spilled out on to the platform when we arrived at Corrour.

Loch Ossian

Popped into the SYHA Corrour Station House hostel to have a nosy and pick up a few supplies (in addition to serving snacks and meals, they sell crisps, chocolate bars, drinks, local OS maps and other useful items) before heading east on the track to Loch Ossian. The crowds soon thinned and, at the junction by Loch Ossian Youth Hostel, I headed south on the grassy track to Lubnaclach.

Thanks to a reasonably sustained period of good weather, it was dry as a bone underfoot and I made good progress, passing above Loch na Sgeallaig.

Loch na Sgeallaig

With excellent visibility, the white station house at Corrour remained visible behind me for much of the day and I also enjoyed fine views of Leum Uilleum, a peak so often clad in mist.

Two and a half kilometres south of Loch Ossian Youth Hostel I reached a junction and made the short detour west to the ruin at Lubnaclach. Roofless, it offers only the most modest shelter from the elements but for once on Rannoch moor I was in no need of refuge, so sat outside to enjoy a sandwich in the sun.

Lubnaclach

I returned to the junction and headed north east, the track rising gently towards the Road to the Isles. It was a little marshy underfoot in places but, after crossing a bridge over the Allt a’Choire Odhair Bhig, the terrain dried out considerably over the final pull to the Road to the Isles.

Bearing left at a junction marked by a tiny cairn, I followed the rough road south east to the ruins of Corrour Old Lodge, once Scotland’s highest shooting lodge.

Blackwater Reservoir from Corrour Old Lodge

Enjoying commanding views over Rannoch Moor to the Blackwater Reservoir, it was replaced by a new lodge at the east end of Loch Ossian. The ruins are fairly extensive and indicate the presence of a substantial dwelling and stable block. It is a real shame it is no longer occupied for it would have made a fine place to live.

The Road to the Isles

After exploring the ruins, I continued on the Road to the Isles, climbing to Clach na Fhuarain before beginning the long descent to civilisation. The route drops to a small woodland, where it curves right at a junction and follows the Allt Eigheach south. In due course, the track fords the river but walkers should continue along the west bank for a short distance to reach a bridge spanning the flow.

Loch Eigheach

The track continues south, then south east to meet the B846 at Loch Eigheach. Here I turned right and followed the road west, back to Rannoch Station and the end of what turned out to be a hot and sweaty but gloriously enjoyable Good Friday trek over the Road to the Isles.

WALK FACTS

Distance: 12 miles/19.5km
Time: 5 hours
Start: Corrour Station (GR: NN 355664)
Finish: Rannoch Station
Map: Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger sheet 41 (Ben Nevis, Fort William & Glencoe)

Beinn Pharlagain

Route: Head E from railway station to Loch Ossian Youth Hostel, then go S on grassy track to  Lubnaclach (ruin). Follow grassy track NE, then E, rising to join Road to the Isles. Turn right and walk SE to Corrour Old Lodge. Continue SE, climbing to Clach na Fhuarain before descending to meet Allt Eigheach. Follow track S, then SE to meet B846 at Loch Eigheach. Turn right and follow road W to Rannoch Station.

2 thoughts on “Glorious Good Friday on Rannoch Moor

  1. Corrour Old Lodge – reputed to have once been an isolation hospital. I have been researching this for a couple of years and found virtually nothing to confirm this. What information, or photos, do you know of, dating from before the 1980s???? Any information gratefully received and will be acknowledged if used.

  2. HI I READ THAT IT STOPPED BEING USED AS A SHOOTING LODGE IN THE LATE 1900’S THEN IT WAS THE HOSPITAL.THEY SAY IT WAS MAINLY USED FOR GAS SUFFERERS,THEY THOUGHT THE FRESH AIR WOULD HELP.WHAT I CAN’T DISCOVER IS WHEN IT WAS FIRST BUILT.IF YOU FIND ANY INFO ON IT COULD YOU EMAIL ME? I’D BE VERY GRATEFULL BECAUSE I WANT TO TAKE MY METAL DETECTOR THERE.MY EMAIL IS gogzz@gogzz.plus.com

    regards
    Gordon Swinton

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